Monthly Archives: October 2016

The Challenge of Finding Skilled Labor: Discovering a New Approach

Contributed by Jim Lynn

Finding a few qualified candidates to hire out of 7.9 million people can be trickier than you might think. 7.9 MILLION is how many people are currently unemployed in the U.S. according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Surely there must be plenty of great horticultural candidates in that huge number. It should be easy to find somebody who wants to work in our industry, right? Think again.

When looking for a strong candidate to work with our crew at Christie Dustman & Co., we are looking for a well-rounded individual that has experience, education, passion, and stamina. We don’t think that’s too much to ask for, is it? Well, it can be difficult to find such an individual who doesn’t mind working in all kinds of weather conditions!

We took a different approach to hiring this year and tried something new: if we can’t find candidates to match our needs, maybe we can take the candidates we have coming in and train them into the fine gardeners we are looking for!

hiring - JhylikThis year, we had two candidates for crew member positions who were eager to get into the landscaping industry but didn’t have the experience or rounded knowledge base that we were looking for. However, both were willing to learn, have a passion for plants and importantly, are likable. Thus, they were high potential candidates, and we let them join the team for a trial period with the crew in the field. On a typical tryout, we have each individual work with each of hiring - Sarahour crew members to get feedback and see how adaptable and teachable they are.

Our new hiring approach has been a great success. If every tryout ended in success we wouldn’t have to have them, but this year we were lucky – we added two new crew members through this process! Welcome to Jhylik and Sarah!

It’s Time to Start Thinking About Bulbs!

Hello Garden Lovers,Allium Globemaster

It’s bulb time! We are planting bulb “overlays” for our Clients’ gardens, meaning that we plan a sequenced bulb display (big or small) and plant them in between your other plants in the garden. these bulbs bloom from March to May, giving color and interest well before your garden gets into gear.

Ornithogalum nutans Silver BellsWith bulbs, it is not uncommon to plant 500 crocus, for example, to get an abundant visual impact. This means that bulbs can cost $300 to $500 to $700 in materials, then double it for the planting labor. We plant each bulb to make sure it is at the proper depth and “right side up.”

Email or call us by Friday, October 21st if you’re interested in bringing some early spring color to your gardens! I will need to know what you are comfortable spending and with that in mind, I can tell Narcissus Little Gemyou what to plant and where to plant it for the best impact.

Best,

Christie

Falling for Containers

Contributed by Tim Wholey

Reflecting on this past summer, one word jumps out – RAIN – or more specifically, the lack of it.  It was one of the hottest and driest on record. We added “deep watering” to our garden maintenance regime this past summer and let many hoses trickle on plants at our clients’ homes during this severe drought. Even with hoses and an irrigation system, the lack of rain has been hard on gardens. The poor plants just looked hot and brown!

This brings me to my passion: outdoor containers. I love that containers are easy to water, require very little water overall – and it doesn’t take much time! Quite different than large gardens!

With our fall container season starting this week, I have to say that I’m looking forward to it this year more than ever. I’ve just started replacing summer blooms with flowers reflecting all the colors of the new season:  golds, yellows, reds, oranges and purples. It has been a welcome change for all of us.

Consider the ease and beauty burst of a container for this fall at your house – I’d love to work with you!