Monthly Archives: June 2015

On the Menu: Top Five Plants for Our Pollinator Friends

Contributed by Jim Lynn

Flowers are finally blooming full force out in the gardens! The early ephemeral plants and bulbs have passed by to make way for the great showy blooms of late spring and early summer. With growing interest in the health of pollinating insects like Honeybees and the Monarch Butterfly, as gardeners we need to be planting the right flowers for our fluttering friends. Here is my Top 5 List of Plants for Pollinators.

2015-6-17 Blue anise hyssopBlue Fortune Anise Hyssop – Agastache ‘Blue Fortune’  This showy perennial blooms from early/mid-July all the way to the beginning of October! With an attractive Anise aroma and tall purple spike flowers, this interactive plant for the landscape has foliage that attracts pollinators of all kinds. If you are lucky enough, you might also find Mantis hanging out in the plant looking for a snack of its own. This perennial will self-seed heavily if the flower spikes are not removed after blooms have passed.

2015-6-17 Asclepias tuberosaButterfly Flower – Asclepias tuberosa  With a name like Butterfly Flower this type of Milkweed MUST make the list! Asclepias are known to be an important part of the life cycle for the Monarch Butterfly. Sometimes referred to as the caviar of butterflies, caterpillars of the Monarch need this as a host plant to make the transition from caterpillar to butterfly. Visit The Xerces Society to find out more information on the importance of this plant and helping our pollinator friends. When planting, be sure to find a variety native to your region since the butterflies that visit your gardens will be dependent upon the local varieties.

2015-6-17 Echinacea purpureaPurple Cone Flower – Echinacea purpurea  This wonderful prairie wildflower is great for massing or in meadow plantings and can tolerate drought. It produces large showy flowers that are sturdy and long lasting. Seed heads provide a great landing pad for pollinators and provide winter interest if not cut back. Echinacea is also a valuable herb, much sought after for boosting the immune system. Due to advancements in plant breeding, Echinacea is available in a wide range of colors besides purple.

2015-6-17 MonardaBee Balm / Bergamot – Monarda didyma  Bee-Balms are treasured garden herbs, nectar providers, and showy ornamentals. Monarda will draw attention with its bright spider-like flowers and can form impressive massings. This plant does best with constant moisture and ample space. Deadhead for extended bloom. ‘Jacob Cline’ is a mildew resistant variety and has handsome foliage.

2015-6-17 BaptisiaFalse Indigo – Baptisia australis  Perennial Plant of the Year for 2010! This perennial is a bushy, long-lived plant for the back of a border. It has gray-green foliage, lovely pea-like flowers and likes to stay in one spot. Pods give long season of interest and attract many of the native bees. This drought tolerant plant is not just good for the pollinators but also for water conservation. Once established this plant requires minimal additional watering.

If you’re looking for more ideas for attracting pollinators to your garden, just ask us! We’re always available to help.

On the Rocks

2015-6-3 rock + evergreenContributed by Allan Robinson

For many of us, when we think of the contents of a garden we often think of plants – our favorite perennials, trees or shrubs.  Perhaps an arbor, wall, bench or chair, maybe even a hammock.  Some of us may think of sculptural elements like water, art, gazing balls or a bird bath.  But let’s look at another element that humans have been working with and around since time began:  rock.

From an early perspective, rocks were the byproduct of gardening, moved to the side of the field for easier cultivation.  Think of those iconic fieldstone walls running through the New England woods.  We’ve all come across plenty of rocks, perhaps more than we care to think about.  Just how many times has our planting progress been thwarted by that all too familiar jarring feeling and corresponding metal-on-stone audible clank?  Many of us would be happy to never see another stone in our gardens again!  But I suggest taking another look at stone.

Rocks can be used as sculptural elements in the garden to satisfy a need for form, function or both.  Smaller stones can provide a path to, or edge along, our favorite perennial bed.  Larger rocks can be an enduring four season focal point or act as a seat to catch a moment’s rest.  A jagged rock protruding from the earth creates a sense of drama whereas a rounded stone nestled among ground covers can be soothing and look natural.  Rocks can be the backdrop to show off one of our favorite plants.  Rocks with crags or a depression can collect water and attract wildlife.  And if your “thumb” errs on the brown side rather than green, you’ll never have to worry about watering, killing or overwintering rocks.

Let us help you look at rocks in a positive light!